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FIRST LOOK AT THE EVOL TAC

American Air Arms designs always start from a clean slate and are never just another example of the industry standard. They are engineered to meet a specific vision, purpose and performance goals before any chips hit the shop floor. When the vision and purpose are clear, the performance goals are analyzed and found to be reasonable and attainable, only then can the actual design begin. This philosophy is what makes the guns lean, clean and gives them the exceptional effectiveness, performance and purpose they are known for. The creation of the EVOL TAC was first just a great idea out of pure LOVE for Airgunning and the need for the ultimate in performance and durability. The EVOL’s  first rendering was putting the idea into a usable format that could be changed and adjusted before the actual rifle was ever built.

evol rendering

American Air Arms products are designed using 3D CAD and manufactured on state of the art CNC machining centers completely in the USA. This is one of the first early model prototype EVOL .30 TAC’s that’s been outfitted for field testing.

evol .30 tac

This rifle has been outfitted with the Magpul PRS buttstock, Magpul MOE grip,  Magpul AFG foregrip, Magpul RSA QD sling mounts, nylon/neoprene sling, Burris Tactical 30mm scope mounts and a Hawke Frontier 5-30 Scope. The total weight is 10lbs 4 oz. PRS buttstock with the RSA QD picatinny mount. The PRS is a fixed stock with adjustable pull and cheek riser.

magpul buttstock

This stock is much heavier than collapsing or folding units, though it is very rigid and doesn’t rattle around as some others may. RSA Quick Disconnect mount on the lower makes adding a sling both simple and adjustable. The amount of components available for this platform are nearly endless and can meet just about anyone’s needs.

evol tac sling

Lot’s of Airgun shooters are going to feel a sense of “Home” when handling this rifle. It’s really a testament to Eugene Stoner’s AR-15 design; the EVOL effortlessly fell into the AR form. I love the big bores but have been bugging Tom for two years to build something like this. I’m not sure if Tom Costan will agree but I think he surprised himself, it came out nicer than he imagined.

Tom Costan with evol .30

I have shot both guns at the Extreme Benchrest and to be honest the whole time I kept thinking about how great the TAC version would be to hunt with. Both the TAC and tradition EVOL rifles are very lightweight and as the SLAYER are near indestructible. The side-lever design is beyond a pleasure to use and will make follow up shots a breeze when hunting.

evol 30 next to ar15

The EVOL is shooting very consistently at 890 fps with the JSB 44 grain pellets and too a very unique feature is that the magazine has been designed to accommodate Polymags as well. This is the trigger group for the Slayer Hi-Power Rifle and EVOL Sport Carbine models.

evol trigger group

It’s a package type unit that is adjusted before assembly into the action. It too is also possible to adjust once installed as well.
Features:
-True two stage.
-Wire EDM cut and heat treated tool steel sears.
-First stage pull weight.
-First stage position.
-Second Stage pull weight.
-Second stage break.
-Over-travel
-Pull is adjustable from 2 lbs to ~ 4 oz

All EVOL model rifles are regulated to deliver consistent shot to shot velocity and maximize shot count.

evol regulator

The side mounted gauge and foster fill was the solution to many complaints and concerns with the end of tube placement. The magazines are very similar to the EVOL‘s big brother the SLAYER in being all aluminum and self indexing holding 8 rounds. The barrels twists were selected for long range performance with the intent of eliminating spiraling past 100 yards.  Several rates and land configurations were evaluated as well as some “name brand” barrels.  The twist rates are designed around pellets and are NOT suitable for slugs.  The goal for EVOL’s is the most ergonomic, consistent and accurate pellet shooter available while optimizing performance for the most common commercially available pellets.

Action Side Lever Regulated Rotary Magazine Rotary Magazine Rotary Magazine
Single Shot Tray Single Shot Tray Single Shot Tray
Barrel Length 18 in 18 in 18 in
Caliber 0.218 in 0.250 in .300 in
Twist 1:19 in 1:32 in 1:42 in
Physical Weight* 7.0 lbs 7.0 lbs 7.0 lbs
Length w/ moderator 39in 39in 39in
Length wo/ moderator 35in 35in 35 in
Lenght of Pull 14.0 in 14.0 in 14.0 in
Performance Power 20 – 40 fpe 40 – 60 fpe 80 – 90 fpe
Shot count 200 – 100 ~60 ~36
Trigger Pull < 0.5 – 4.0 lbs < 0.5 – 4.0 lbs < 0.5 – 4.0 lbs
Reservoir Capacity 290cc 290cc 290cc
Max Fill Pressure 4000psi 4000psi 4000psi

* Tactical weight with Magul MOE Buttstock.

EVOL .30 TAC

EVOL Sport Carbine Features:

1 Titanium reservoir
2 Internally adjustable regulator
3 Hammer forged chromemoly, tensioned and shrouded barrel system
4 Quick and easy side lever action
5 Self indexing rotary magazine (all aluminum design)
6 True two stage trigger (position, first and second stage, pull, and stop are adjustable)
7 MIL-STD-1913 Picitinny scope rail with 25 MOA included
8 600px-Canada_Maple_Leaf.svg SSG anti-bounce hammer system
9 Rear velocity adjuster
10 Industry standard QD Foster fill connection

 

Quality cannot be obtained without understanding the limitations of manufacturing with modern technology; every American Air Arms Airgun is a combination of vision and technology combined with passion for old world craftsmanship. An American Air Arms Airgun will exceed  expectations, provide exceptional service, pride of ownership and one that will be shared with future generations.

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SLAYER & FRIENDS HUNT THE HIGH DESERT

Went to the high desert yesterday to hunt with Jessi (Lefty) and to meet Ray later on in the morning. Jessi and I arrived early at 4:15 am to set up our kits and hike into the hunting area.

I was using the American Air Arms .357 Slayer and Jessi was using his .22 Cricket Bullpup. We hiked several hundred yards from the truck and waited for the sun to come up hoping to view the amber ears in the distance. We walked around for a bit and I spotted a Jackrabbit ears at 150+ yards but they soon disappeared behind the thick foliage of Joshua trees.

By this time it was close to 7:00 am and we packed up to go meet Ray and his collection of Marauders at another location. Spent a bit of time hanging out and shooting a few of the guns he brought including a .25 Prod conversion.

We all spread out about 40 yards apart and walked towards the North looking for some Jackrabbits moving through the trees, I soon spotted one at 65 yards and was able to take him with the Slayer. What a mess that .357 138 grain (John Cripe) made pellet made.

We continued our walk and I soon spotted some amber ears at 60 yards, took aim with the Slayer and THWACK, a 3′ long trail of blood. I had wondered why my aim was a bit off and soon noticed I had made the dumb mistake of loading the magazine backwards,not sure how other than just not paying attention.

By this time it was about 10:00 am and getting fairly hot, Jackrabbits by now were taking refuge in the shade and much harder to find. This desert is very unforgiving to animals and requires a lot of water to survive. Jessi came across a sheep that wasn’t so lucky!

I had already taken two Jackrabbits so I wanted to focus my energy on helping Ray make his first Jackrabbit kill. I manned the binoculars and picked a spot near where I had made a previous 200 yard kill,offering a good amount of sight and open fields.

Ray was eager to learn and followed close behind as I was able to stalk within 95 yards of what I thought was just one Jackrabbit. We got within range when I noticed one run away leaving one more in a still position to make a shot, Ray aimed his .25 Marauder and made a flawless head-shot at 95 yards. I was as excited as he was being able to witness his first Jackrabbit kill, that smile was well worth the whole day of the trip.

By this time it was approaching 3:00 pm and we were getting lots of sun and very exhausted from our hiking around in the heat.

Jessi was having great luck with the ground squirrels and by this time had killed 6, some as far as 100 yards away. We continued for about another hour when I spotted a small size Jackrabbit that left me with a good 100 yard shot to the head.

The day had ended and we were all left with great memories and may have learned a few things as well.

 

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The American Airgun Revolution

The Airgun industry is flourishing here in the United States and many have called it the Golden Age for our sport. Many new manufactures are sprouting up across the states, some new and some that have been around for years. Over the past several years I have seen the market for airguns soar higher than before and with that comes ingenuity and growth. The European airguns have been on top of the high end market and I feel as though us Americans have just as much to offer as far as quality craftsmanship. My goal is to show that you don’t need to look overseas to find quality and performance, we have that right here at home.

In no particular order the first company I wanted to acknowledge here is Mac1 Airguns that has been around for over 80 years, 30 of those ran by Tim McMurray. The Mac1 legacy has set some tall standards for quality, craftsmanship and performance. Tim McMurray has earned a reputation for making accuracy and he could not be more pleased about that. “Pushing the envelope is what makes it all so fun I can hardly believe it has already represented three decades of my life as owner. I know how lucky I am to be able to compete with and build these fine airguns. It is icing on the cake I’ve shot fairly well for the last year. Enjoying these guns in a competition environment is exciting and satisfying.” I have gone to quite a few Airgun shows, competitions etc, and Tim is always just one who is always willing to give advice in hopes to help someone succeed.

The Hunter BR is the Ultimate Benchrest Airgun. Barrels are between 24 and 25″ long and all but the usable rifling at each end has been removed. The rear 6″ of this barrel is cut down to around .630″. It sports an American made 6 groove cut rifled barrel made
to Mac1 specs with 1 in 24 Twist Rate (Custom Twist Rates Available). If you wish to play with the Big Dogs you need to go with the good barrels or hope you find the 1 in a 100 barrels made to production standards that winds up exceptional. American barrel makers are the best in the world and we now have a number of them trying their luck in the AG arena. That is a very healthy thing for AG BR and AG accuracy nuts in general.The combination of ultimate build quality and great Airgun Barrel gives these fine rifles the kind of accuracy championships are made of. A plastic hard case is included along with the necessary bolt on parts to set the gun in a proper Bench Rest and bags. Tubes can be 24. 26, or 28″ long in black or clear. Accessories fill adapters and scope mounts are extra. You can have the base plate, tube plug, butt plate and receiver matching color in red, blue, clear or black. This configuration is an upright rifle that the action is inline and grip at Bottom Dead center with Scope rail at Top Dead center. This makes for a more conventional BR gun. Mac1 Airguns


The second company I want to discuss is Wicked Air Rifles, a company that has been around for awhile and too well known for tuning Marauder rifles. Travis Whitney and Jim Gaska have created the FLEX line of rifles that are proudly made in USA and have achieved a very unique market for hunters. I have watched and admired this company grow and explode in the market place as they have some very unique, user friendly rifles and pistols.

These guns are very sturdy looking and the frame is a single piece of aluminum that uses AR furniture. Each gun is hand assembled and tuned to customer satisfaction. Wicked Air Rifles pride themselves on service and will go above and beyond to work with the customers needs. These guns have a rail system that allows easy adjustment of accessories such as a bi-pod or go pro camera. It’s a side bolt design with retracting bolt to move out of air path. No bounce hammer and high flow valve. Changing springs and power adjustments are easy in that the average Joe can work on without difficulty.  The rifle can achieve 20-200 FPE  (depending on caliber selection) Adjustable power levels. Timney Calvin Elite 2 stage trigger group, Carbon fiber bottle, Fully floating Tensioned barrel. Made In The USA!!! Wicked Air Rifles


The next company that holds a special place in my life and too has given me a true look into the Airgun world is American Air Arms. They are mostly known for the Slayer Big Bore Bullpups and Rifles. Founded by Tom Costan, an engineer, avid airgunner, and airgun hunter with a love of all shooting sports. These PCP Airguns are completely and proudly made in the USA with nearly 100% American made materials! All parts (except barrels, grips and bolts) are engineered and manufactured in their own facility using state of the art CNC machining centers.  In-house manufacturing allows them complete control over the quality of they’re product. The designs always start from a clean slate and are never just another example of the industry standard. They are engineered to meet a specific vision, purpose, and performance goals before any chips hit the shop floor. When the vision and purpose are clear, the performance goals are analyzed and found to be reasonable and attainable, only then can the actual design begin. This philosophy is what makes their guns lean, clean and gives them the exceptional effectiveness, performance and purpose they are known for.

Some of the noteworthy features of the EVOL are: built in 25MOA, regulated, shrouded and tensioned Tj Enterprises barrel, integral moderator, indestructible side-lever action, 7-9 round magazine (depending on caliber), Match quality two stage trigger (adjustable in every way), and 100% made in the USA!  All calibers have “metal” magazines designed to accept polymags without modification. American Air Arms has described quality as: Excellence in engineering, reliability, precision, purpose and performance.  Quality cannot be obtained without understanding the limitations of manufacturing with modern technology; every American Air Arms Airgun is a combination of vision and technology combined with passion for old world craftsmanship.  An American Air Arms Airgun will exceed  expectations, provide exceptional service, pride of ownership and one that will be shared with future generations. American Air Arms


Our last company is RAW Rapid Air Weapons a company that has set a huge name for itself in quality and craftsmanship. Rapid Air Weapons LLC was formed in 2006 as a supplier of  Precision Air Rifle components and accessories, today they manufacture, as well as supply high quality components and products for the shooting industry from their factory using the latest in CNC multi axis machines. They take building rifles extremely serious, from very early on parts are inspected at each stage to ensure they meet expectations on quality. Throughout the building stages everything is hand inspected before being installed and assembled up into a finished rifle. Specialist tools and gauges check barrel alignment in relationship to the action and scope rail, if it doesn’t pass they’re strict tests it will not leave the factory.  Having over 28 years manufacturing and design experience at Theoben their company CEO Martin has the most experience in the business when it comes to Theoben Products, with this extensive knowledge gained over decades they are able to offer some great products.  Rapid Air Weapons has an impressive line of precision Air Rifles and products manufactured in the USA and an even more impressive collection of trophy’s and medals won by users.

This high power model comes regulated and fitted with a quick fill system with an incorporated pressure gauge, powering the HM1000 is a 480cc air cylinder and a high quality German match grade barrel, finished with an carbon fiber barrel sleeve and integral carbon fiber moderator or barrel weight where required, the rifle comes equipped with a multi shot magazine or it can be single shot loaded, machined into the action is a new style picatinny rail with 22 MOA to give the shooter added ability to zero at longer distances, both picatinny and weaver mounts will fit. The trigger is a fully adjustable sporting version of our TM1000 target trigger with an added safety catch, the stock is made from laminate or walnut and hand oiled for weather protection and fitted with an adjustable butt pad and stippled for a secure grip while in the aim. All aluminum parts are coated for protection and the internal components are hand finished, hammer and trigger parts are hardened and polished for extra smoothness in reloading as well as making for a cleaner firing cycle, the sidelever linkage and bolt have been hardened ready for a lifetime of work. Rapid Air Weapons


The four companies in this read are just my own hand picked example of whats available to the American consumer and shows we don’t have to go European to find quality. For myself I enjoy shooting all types of Airguns but over the past few years have learned I prefer the quality I can find at home in the USA!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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AEROMAGNUM BIG BORE HUNT

Aeromagnum Aeromunition

On Sept 17th Marley and I left the house at 3:00 am and headed 68 miles North to an area we have recently been frequenting. It was a fairly warm morning, enough so that we left the windows down in the Jeep. Marley is a 3yo Dachshund/Lab mix, the perfect little rabbit dog being she’s small enough to get under the brush but yet strong enough to get through the day of hunting. As we turned off the highway onto the long dirt road heading further North we could almost immediately see Cottontail rabbits grazing right next to the road. Marley was sitting up front with me glaring out the windows excited as she knew we were going hunting.

Several days before I had acquired some Aeromagnum .358 128gr HP Devastator’s made by Al Clark over at Aeromagnum  to try and to give some feedback on. The pellets are hand cast and very well packaged, too upon removal were noticeably uniform. These were obviously very well made and loaded very smoothly. These are among the best ammo I have seen in production cast pellets.  I tried the best I could to hurry up getting ready as Marley was very impatient and kept telling me to hurry up.  ;D

After I loaded up my magazine it was barley becoming light out as I stood in front of my jeep having a smoke before venturing through the gate and out into the giant field. As I went through the gate I could see a Jackrabbit moving slowly out to my right at about 90 yards. I walked quietly trying to get up onto a small hill that I thought may give me a better shot over the brush and too for a better vantage point for a follow up shot. I got to the top of the hill and was able to take a kneeling shot that broadsided the Jackrabbit as he was hopping away. I have to say I have never heard a bone crack like that ever while hunting, It was loud. Marley and I  immediately ran over to the kill site only to see a big mess where I had to boot her away because she was trying to carry it as it was being pulled in half. Pretty gross. As the photograph shows these Aeromagnum hollow points do exactly what they were designed for and achieve maximum expansion.

Marley and I had one in the bag and continued to make our way up into a canyon crevice where I suspected many Jackrabbits were going to be heading through. I have found that crevices like in this photo make great hunting, especially when the sun is to your back.

We sat and  waited till the sun was just up over the hill behind us and soon Marley spotted a fairly large Jackrabbit moving down through the crevice just like I had imagined they would. This one was fairly close around 45 yards. I lined up for a headshot but he had moved behind a bush as I pulled the trigger sprinting his way up the hillside finally slowing down over 100 yards up near some rocks where I was able to connect. I’m still not sure if I hit him or if the shot ricochet off the rocks into him, either way he was down and Marley made sure of it.

By this time it was coming near 9:00 as we ventured up over the mountaintop and down over the other side where the brush was a little more scattered and in some cases easier to see movement. We sat and waited being shaded by a rather small bush but still better than nothing as it was getting hot.

We sat and waited near 30 minutes before I spotted a Jackrabbit hopping down a hillside at 85 yards, he was moving pretty slow and ended up stopping right behind a bush. It gets frustrating because when a Jackrabbit moves you never really know what direction. I had just hoped that he would move out and away from the bush just long enough to make a shot, usually it takes flushing them out that unfortunately leaves you with only a running shot.

I finally saw the top of his head that allowed me enough to take a shot,it looked as though I missed as it quickly moved behind a bush as Marley ran towards to retrieve. I guess its a good thing I had my little bunny Slayer to finish it off. She brought it back and it was clear that I had barley skimmed its shoulder.

By this time it was getting much hotter so I had decided we should head back as it was several hours home. The day turned out pretty good and I’m very pleased with how well we did considering its late Summer and this area is usually not very active for this time of year. I really want to thank Al from Aeromagnum for allowing me some pellets to do some hunting with and giving me something to post about. I would have posted much sooner but have been so busy with work and preparation for the Extreme Benchrest 2016.

Hope to have more soon. 8)

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HUNTING WITH THE .308/.357 SLAYERS

On Thursday June 16th Terry and I set out at 4:30am to make our way several hours North to meet Tom and his son Nick for a two day hunt.We had chosen to get out during the week to allow us to beat the heat wave and to avoid people that frequent the area during weekends. As Terry and I drove down the long dirt road I couldn’t help but to imagine we were in the African Plains going on some kind of wild safari. Part of the excitement for me on trips like this is the feeling of being a kid again,problems and worries just slip away and the thought of adventure takes over. We arrived to find our usual camping area quite empty with the only occupant being a very nice old man who was just traveling through.

He had came over and talked to Terry and I being intrigued by the fact we were using airguns to hunt with. He had even brought up the famous “Lewis and Clark” expedition and was very familiar with the use of the  Girardoni air rifle. I really enjoyed talking to him and to spark someone’s interest in our fine sport. By this time it was 7:15 and we were soon joined by Tom and his son Nick who had decided to join us being he had just gotten on Summer break. The weather was nice and clear with a good solid breeze that kept things cool for most of the day. We all aired up our guns and filled our pockets and gear bags with pellets and water to set out for some Jackrabbit hunting. Terry and I were the first ones through the gate and into the fields where we almost immediately started seeing large Jackrabbits,they were simply everywhere so it seemed. I was using the first prototype .357 Slayer loaded with 127gr pellets provided by nielsenspecialtyammo.com along with Terry who was using his .22 Tapian Mutant Bullpup loaded with his custom made 22.5gr slugs. We hiked around the same locations as our last trip over a month ago that proved to still be full of action after taking 14 of them in two days. It didn’t take long to empty my magazine and exhaust my air supply from shooting at so many Jackrabbits, having a gun that has so much range capability makes it difficult to not shoot at something.      ;D

After an hour or so I had made my way back to camp to get something to eat and to cool off in the shade for awhile waiting for the others to return. Soon Tom and Nick made there way back into camp followed 45 minutes later by Terry, all of them with the same story of  how many Jackrabbits they had seen. Tom had taken a fairly hard fall on a rocky hillside that had knocked his .308 Slayer up pretty good along with his hand. Thankfully he was ok and the gun with only a few noticeable scratches with the zero being questionable. After several minutes of rest I had spotted a large Jackrabbit out in a nearby field, Tom had invited me to use his .308 and take it out as I had not really used it much. The first thing I noticed was the weight difference being lighter with the aluminum shroud and the fact it was a right handed model as I had been used to shooting the left handed prototype. The pellets I was using were 111gr provided by Nick over at nielsenspecialtyammo.com I took the gun expecting to be gone for only a few minutes but being it shot so nicely I ended up being gone for close to two hours. The area I was hunting had many hills that offered amazing views and vantage points to sniper style shooting. The gun was zeroed at 85 yards using a Leapers Accushot 30mms scope with etched glass reticle, one of my favorite scopes for hunting being fairly rugged. The first shot I took felt great with little recoil,similar in feeling to a pellet gun but with much more authority and thump. I was amazed at how flat shooting it was and how much more controllable it felt over the big brother .357 Slayer. The first Jackrabbit I was able to hit was at 60 yards moving through some thick sage,nice solid chest shot that made a clean kill.

Jackrabbit kill .308 slayer

Jackrabbit kill .308 slayer

I hiked around a bit more and found a good spot to sit and rest along with having a good vantage point to sniper a few with the first one taken at 115 yards with a solid hard hitting shoulder shot. The second one was very close to the first only he ran several hundred yards up a hill before stopping towards the top at a little over 300 yards. I gave the gun so much holdover that I couldn’t even see the Jackrabbit in my scope,kinda just guessed but ended up hitting solid throwing him into a backflip where he did the death dance.

I headed back to camp dragging these two kangaroos that get very heavy after hiking with them for several miles,Nick was kind enough to come over and help me get everything over the fence. As I walked into camp my presence had awoken Tom from his afternoon siesta under the giant shade tree. He immediately had concluded that the earlier spill had not effected the POI at all apparently. :o
My feet were sore and the sun by this time was taking its toll making relaxing in the shade seem like the best option along with drinking plenty of water. Terry came back into camp exhausted as the rest of us telling of how many Jackrabbits he had encountered and the few that got away. We pretty much stayed in camp until 6:00pm when we all set back out together to try a new area I had found on Google Earth. The area was about a mile hike South from camp and looked to be very good and one of the few places that were still a bit green.

airgun hunting

We all stayed close together and Tom was the first to make a shot on a Jackrabbit that was foraging in a small clearing,we all stalked the Jackrabbit and eventually all missed him as he disappeared in the thick sagebrush. A few more minutes went by and Tom spotted another running through the sage only to run several hundred yards with Tom and I taking turns trying to hit him. These big bores are simply amazing able to come several feet from hitting a running Jackrabbit at out to 400 yards. The loop we took was several miles through fields and mountains where we ended back at camp by 8:15pm. The night was lit by a full moon and offered us a nice relaxing evening being nice enough to even sleep outside. Later in the night I could hear Coyotes chattering in the distance and a hoot owl perching in the tree above our camp. The next morning had started later than I hoped as we had all slept a bit later than expected being so tired from the day before hunting. Terry and I aired up our guns and set out in close to the same loop as the evening before but ended up going much further. I had spotted a Jackrabbit sitting up in the sagebrush at 25 yards,shot a bit to high only to see a puff of fur from my pellet skimming the top of his head. These Hares are so fast and hard to spot that hunting them can get very frustrating. I can’t tell you how many shots I experience that’s like “How in the heck did I miss?” I followed Terry for a bit as I enjoyed taking pics and to be careful with my air supply and ammo,not having very good luck with any good shots. Terry spotted a good size Jackrabbit at around 30 yards where he was able to connect his shot,from the sound he had hit him hard. The Jackrabbit slowly ran away into some thick sagebrush making it very difficult to find and when you did it wouldn’t stay still long enough to make a shot. We both spent a good amount of time scouring the area to find him with no luck. A few hundred more yards on our hike I spotted a good size Ground Squirrel sitting on a rock that Terry was able to take at 35 yards.

Terry and I kept hiking higher and higher up into the mountains and by this time I had used up all my shots barely missing several Jackrabbits I had encountered on the rocky hillsides. We found a good saddle where we took a rest before we climbed even higher where we had to make it up over the next mountain and back towards our camp. The mountain we were climbing proved difficult with it being near vertical at some points. We too were running low on water that’s never a good thing in the blazing desert sun.

American airgunner

After making it to the top of the mountain we were both exhausted and had decided to take the easiest straight route back to camp that was thankfully mostly downhill. I was the first to stagger into camp where I found Tom and Nick as exhausted as we were relaxing in the shade. The first thing on my mind was to get some water and to cut open a watermelon that had been on ice. What a hunt,ended with 4 hard earned kills and legs that felt like jello. We all packed up our things and set out down the road till the next time. The best part of every hunt like this is the time spent with good friends and the adventure of exploring nature. Hope to share more soon but until then “Best Wishes” 8)

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Jackrabbit Safari

On Friday morning the 13th of May Terry and I set out several hours North to meet up with Jessi where we would be spending three days hunting Jackrabbits. The area we were hunting is very close to resembling East Africa, it’s home to animals such as Pronghorn Antelope, Tule elk, Fox, Coyote, Mountain Lions, Wild Pigs and a wide variety of birds. The area is vast and consist of approx 38,900 acres of huntable area, one of the more remote locations I frequent.

gun28

The drive in was very pleasant with the weather being nice and cool with a slight breeze, perfect temp for hiking around. We arrived to find Jessi waiting excitedly to tell us how busy he had been already bagging three Jackrabbits. After hearing of his success we all had that excited Christmas morning feeling. We set up camp and headed out of the campground on foot heading towards previously scouted areas that later proved to be exploding with Jackrabbit populations. Jessi had brought several guns but he had chosen his S200AA .177 tuned to 14fpe, beautiful gun it is.

hunting jackrabbits

He had taken this shot from 65 yards.

We all were jackrabbit hunting fairly close together in amazement of how many Jackrabbits were running around, almost had to choose which one you wanted.

gun6

I had brought several guns but had decided to take the Slayer out as some of the brush was very thick and I thought it may be nice to have something that could punch through it.

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Running shot at approx 75 yards.

The area had many hills that made great vantage points to hunt from, offering good long range shots.

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After some time hunting we had all made our way back to camp where we had lunch, talked airguns and relaxed in the shade.

gun20

By this time it was late afternoon and we all set out again to hike around hoping to get some more action. Terry had brought his Tapian Mutant Bullpup .22, beautiful gun that’s made in the Ukraine with a CZ S200 barrel and 12 shot Magazine.

gun2

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I had brought my trusted .22 Marauder and had managed to bag several with that.

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65 yard shot to the neck.

Terry had found a nice vantage point to look down onto a field where we had found quite a few.

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Jessi was back at the camp playing with Terry’s HW97 FT rifle, one of the nicest underlever springers I’ve ever shot.

Jackrabbit hunting day two started out early for us as we set out at sunrise to look for the elusive amber ears.

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The views from the mountaintops were truly amazing, picture perfect. I was enjoying just being away from work and being out with my friends in the place I love. Next to having a large abundance of animals this place also had a wide variety of very beautiful plant-life.
gun5

The area was so vast that you can easily get lost in walking the mountains and grasslands, most of the Jackrabbits we had found were in the thick brush. What was happening was I would walk trying to spot one in the shadows only to spring one several feet away. It would take off only to stop on a hillside giving only seconds to make a shot. I had a good amount of luck hunting from the hillsides catching them in the valleys between hills.

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80 yards across a canyon.

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Got this one running up a hillside at 30 yards

We met back at camp for a late lunch where after we did some exploring of a nearby building that had been part of a cattle ranch in the late 1800s. Very neat and well preserved stall that is still in use today by equestrians that sometimes pass through for a rest.

gun25

After lunch I had set out again, this time heading further out of the valley where I had seen some dog size Jackrabbits. I hiked several miles North up into some unexplored hillsides where I was able to take several very large Jackrabbits, possibly the largest I’ve ever seen up close. The one I took was by pure luck as he wandered in front of me at 60 yards on a hillside, second one I spotted running at around 45 yards through some thick brush. Made my way back to camp with something to show and a big smile on my face, what a rush it is to have some success.

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While I was out tromping around I had noticed a few larger Jackrabbits, problem was they were far out of reach for the Marauder. It was by this time late afternoon but the perfect time to take the Slayer out. I had been shooting it quite a bit so only had several rounds left I had been saving for long range kills. I hiked up a trail near the camp that offered a great view of the entire valley, my plan was to sit and wait for movement below. The past few weeks I had been practicing at 300/400 yards so had become very comfortable at those ranges and proficient with doping for wind. After only a few minutes of waiting I had spotted several large Jackrabbits at over 500 yards away. Having no experience at that range I decided to wait for one to come closer,didn’t take long for the both of them to make there way in. The first shot I took was a bit under 400 yards, landing several inches under his feet causing him to sprint away to the right. The second Jackrabbit ran behind a bush that was impossible to see through or over even at the elevation I was at. After waiting a few minutes I decided I had to move position to the opposite mountain to see behind the bush. This proved to be quite the workout as around the valley was several miles. 😛

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The sun was still putting out heat by 4:00pm

I made my way around to the opposing mountain and sat above looking down on my prey at 275 yards, lined up on little over 3 milldots and fired, hitting about an inch or two over his head sending him into a sprint away. The second shot made its way right behind the neck sending him tumbling to a dead stop at 330 yards.

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Great way to end the day.

Day three of jackrabbit hunting started very early as we had been awoken by animal noises and the sounds of critters scurrying around the camp,even found a Jackrabbit leg lying in the camp that morning. Terry was the first in the field with Jessi and I following soon after, this morning was a bit cold and had some clouds coming in from the distance.

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I sat up on a hill looking down into the brush trying to find some to flush out into Terry’s way. He had been standing in an open field where we had seen quite a few hopping around.
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As I looked down I could see Terry had spotted one at 40 yards or so, the Jackrabbit kept getting closer and closer. My first thought was, “Is he calling it in?” The Jack didn’t even see him and at this point was running right at him, couldn’t believe what I was seeing. Terry knelled down and took a shot that I could see went right over the top of the Jackrabbits head, wow a miss and this thing was still coming in. The Jackrabbit got as close as 10yrds and I think in all the excitement Terry had forgotten to give hold under, a mistake I make quite often. Well the Jackrabbit was gone but I have to say it was quite the spectacle from my angle, amazing to watch. We took a break gathering our thoughts over the whole ordeal realizing his poi was off due to using some lighter weight ammo that was causing him to shoot way high.
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We all continued the hunt combing a new area where I had spotted a group of monster Jackrabbits, all three of us were able to get some shots on a few of them.
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This area has some of the most breathtaking views I have ever seen along with being one of my most special areas to hunting jackrabbits. Spending time with good friends as always is the highlight of any trip such as this along with enjoying the beauty of nature and learning a thing or two along the way. A few people were missing from this trip. If your reading this you know who you are and I hope you can make it out for the next adventure. Enclosed are a few other photos in no particular order I hope you all can enjoy 8)

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Jessi with his .22 Huntsman
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Terry looking all serious
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Me examining three holes from one shot 😮
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Looking down on our camp,the only trees for miles.